Questions arise over cycle crash

Noticeboards up days after accident

‘Cyclist did not try to stop’ say police

Doubts are developing about the pace of the police investigation into an accident in Graham Road that resulted in a cyclist being so badly injured she had to be put in a coma to be treated.Loving Dalston has established that though police interviewed people at the scene of the accident, which also involved a black cab, a comprehensive doorknock of residents who may have seen it has not been made. The police used news media to ask anyone with information to phone 020 8345 4912. On Monday 9 August Loving Dalston asked the police why noticeboards appealing for witnesses were not placed at the scene. Residents have told Loving Dalston that noticeboards were placed there the next day.

The accident happened on Thursday 5 August 2010 at around midday.Police told a journalist that the victim, Arina Romanova, 24, of Amhurst Road, Dalston, was cycling south in Navarino Road without a helmet on a fold-up bike and that investigators believe she did not stop at Graham Road but rode into the path of a cab going west at about 20mph. She fell under the vehicle.

Detective Sergeant Joe Lock told the reporter: “It does not seem she was riding erratically but it would appear she did not even attempt to stop at the junction, so there may have been some distraction for her.”

There is no stop sign at Graham Road for cyclists travelling south in Navarino Road. Romanova came to London a few months ago from Latvia to work near Liverpool Street station.The Royal London in Whitechapel, the hospital treating her, would not comment today on why a coma was induced in Romanova. Barbiturate comas, as they termed, are sometimes used to protect the brain during neurosurgery.
Police have made every effort to help and console family members of Romanova. They came to London as soon as they could and were met on arrival by a specially trained officer. They are staying in Hackney.

To see earlier report of this accident, scroll down or press this hyperlink.

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8 thoughts on “Questions arise over cycle crash

  1. Anonymous said … Are you suggesting there should be stop signs for cyclists at every junction? I feel for the cyclist and driver and all involved, but get a grip. None of us know exactly what happened, but we can’t have stop signs at every single junction! 12 August 2010 15:56

    ‘Stop’ signs are not required but I believe ‘Give Way’ signs are. I’ve just checked out the markings for southbound cyclists crossing over Graham Road at Navarino Road. There are the two appropriate road markings, i.e. a white dotted double lines “Give way to traffic on major road” and the white triangle “Warning of Give Way just ahead”.

    http://lookpic.com/d2/i2/1162/JMHrlGMe.jpeg

    It’s difficult to know what else could be done to prevent something similar happening again, apart from giving Graham Road a 20 mph speed limit and/or installing a Touchan crossing (neither of which I believe TfL would approve of).

  2. It does; thank you. The only issue was for me to explain to Loving Dalston readers what “induced coma” meant. The term is used widely, but when the London was unable even to tell me whether my understanding of it was correct, I realised that it was little understood. So I had to explain what “induced coma” was, but without an informed briefing, I resorted to hyperlinking to a respectable medical site. I still do not know whether deep sedation is liable to be maintained for more than a few hours/days/weeks.

  3. “The Royal London in Whitechapel, the hospital treating her, would not comment today on why a coma was induced in Romanova.”

    I don’t see what the issue is here, and why The London should have to comment on a common and integral part of managing major trauma. “Induced coma” is a very frequently-used procedure, most commonly employed by Intensive Care physicians so that a critically ill patient can be intubated and ventilated. A more accurate term would be deep sedation. Controlled ventilation is very important in patients with serious head injuries. If the patient’s conscious level isn’t suppressed with an infusion of sedative/anaesthetic drugs, they would never tolerate the tracheal tube not to mention all the other invasive treatment they’d be having.

    btw, most ITU patients aren’t sedated with barbiturates. Of those used, Thiopentone is the commonest and is a valuable anaesthetic induction agent.

    Hope that clears that up.

  4. Not quite déjà vu but …

    … I missed witnessing last Thursday’s incident by minutes. Yesterday (Thursday)I was on the bus travelling eastward along Graham Road and I saw a woman on a bike (with v. small child) cycle north up Navarino Road. She crossed over Graham Road without looking and without stopping and the bus driver had to brake suddenly to avoid hitting her and the baby.

    It was scary and looked as if the woman had a death wish.

  5. Are you suggesting there should be stop signs for cyclists at every junction? I feel for the cyclist and driver and all involved, but get a grip. None of us know exactly what happened, but we can’t have stop signs at every single junction!

  6. Stop signs in Latvian maybe! Spare a thought for the poor Taxi driver he must feel terrible.

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