Just don’t call my new café a Starbucks, says the Dalston library’s coffee-shop winner

Gurkan Bozdere who, with his father, runs the Sömine restaurant at Crossways in Kingsland High Street, Lon E8

THE BUSINESSMAN at the centre of what has become known as the Starbucks controversy has rejected criticism of his Dalston library coffee-shop deal with Hackney council.

Gurkan Bozdere, who with his father runs the Sömine restaurant at Crossways in Kingsland High Street, said that contrary to reports by local bloggers and commentators, the café at the Dalston CLR James Library, due to open next year, will not be a Starbucks.
He told Loving Dalston: “The deal with Starbucks is not like the usual franchise. The only sign of the American company in the café will be one saying ‘We proudly serve Starbucks’

“I have not chosen a name for the venue – it may be just ‘the Dalston Library café’. But it will not be Starbucks. The café will have a school theme, with old-style classroom desks.

“We want to serve good coffee, so we decided on Starbucks rather than Illy.”

Asked why he did not consider a local supplier such as Climpson and Sons, Bozdere said he was not aware of the Broadway Market, Hackney firm.

Told that his winning the contract to run the venue in the library had also raised doubts among fellow Anglo-Turkish/Kurdish entrepreneurs, Bozdere, who was born in London 28 years ago, said: “I was always confident about how Hackney people would appreciate the idea once they understood the venture.”

He questioned whether it was fair that a report in the Hackney Citizen, a free newspaper, mentioned his name, without, so far as he knew, the writer’s making any attempt to contact him in the interests of balance.

“The approach I have seen by one local paper upset me extremely,” he said. “The reporter did not bother to seek my side of the story.”

David Altheer 151211

* Sömine, 107 Kingsland High Street, Lon E8 2PB (020 7254 7384 )

* Emboldened underscored words in most cases indicate a hyperlink, a reader service rare among websites. If a link does not work, it is probably because the site to which the URL refers has not been maintained.

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3 thoughts on “Just don’t call my new café a Starbucks, says the Dalston library’s coffee-shop winner

  1. The quote should obviously be “We want to serve good coffee, so we decided on Starbucks rather than Illy.” [I don’t quite get your point, Hackneyed. If it clarifies anything, I can add that in the context of the interview, which I have obviously abbreviated, the speaker saw coffee type as a choice of two. — Ed.]

  2. Choosing Starbucks over Illy for the quality… What quality was that, then? The quality of the wonga?!? [Ah, I should have read this comment first, Mr Hackneyed. By coincidence, I am going to Broadway Market later to buy my weekly 1kg of beans.– Ed.]

  3. I don’t think the coverage of this “story” on opendalston.blogspot.com was any better than the Hackney Citizen’s. [I should point out to those who do not know of OPEN Dalston that it is a campaigning organisation and that, as with any interest group, its issuings take clear positions. I declare an interest: I am a founder-member. Of course, not all the members always support all its actions in all ways. That’s democracy. – Ed.]

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