Hackney not so happy for men and their health

The Geffrye Museum in Haggerston, Hackney, Lon, built in 1714 as an almshouse for poor people in bad health

IF YOU ARE male, want to avoid potentially grim old age and have settled in Hackney, Newham or Haringey, stay right where you are.

The areas are among the more deprived in London, and one result is that men in these parts of London are living up to 17 years less than those living in the wealthier boroughs. In the poorest parts of the capital, women outlive men by more than 12 years.

The findings come from research by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which goes on to claim that only a handful of health trusts commissions services specifically aimed at men.

Lead author of a European Union report into men’s health Alan White, of Leeds University said that a lack of initiatives for the male population was a real problem. Professor White added: “There is a blindness to the fact that there are men wanting to use the services and they can’t”.

The bureau found that London primary care trusts, the quangos known as PCTs, spent around £2 million more on women in some sectors than on men’s health. Many London councils “did not spend a penny commissioning services aimed specifically at male wellbeing”.

The bureau asked London PCTs what they spent commissioning services outside the National Health Service over the past five years. Westminster PCT spent £423,560 on women’s services – 55% more than on men’s services at   £272,478.

Two boroughs with the worst disparities, Hackney and Newham, refused to answer.

David Altheer 010712

* Picture: the Geffrye Museum in Hackney, built in 1714 as an almshouse for poor people, who were invariably in bad health. To see an online abstract of the report, press this link

* Emboldened underscored words in most cases indicate a hyperlink, a reader service rare among websites. If a link does not work, it is probably because the site to which the URL refers has not been maintained.

 

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2 thoughts on “Hackney not so happy for men and their health

  1. “Lead author of a European Union report into men’s health Alan White, of Leeds University said that a lack of initiatives for the male population was a real problem. Professor White added: “There is a blindness to the fact that there are men wanting to use the services and they can’t”.

    The leap of logic here is that it implies that if men used the services, they would live longer. A bit more investigation would probably bring out diet, smoking, alcohol, excersise as the main factors in determining longevity.

    Hackney council could also improve the air quality near the borough’s main roads.

    I would hazard a guess that if you compared men from the same educational and income brackets in west and east London, there would be no difference in outcomes.

  2. I suspect that should read: “If you are male, want to avoid potentially grim old age and have considered moving to Hackney, Newham or Haringey, stay right where you are.”

    Or were you being ironic?

    I may be wrong but I thought the female population (particularly among older people) was significantly higher than that of males, which would explain the disparity between gross spending levels on males v females. The disparity between spending levels, identified by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, appears to be based on the incorrect assumption that the number of men is equal to that of women.

    I’m sure a disparity exists, but if one factors in the differential in gender population, the gap is not as great as that depicted in the BIJ’s otherwise excellent research work.

    The intro was addressing males who, paraphrasing a pop song, hope to die before they get old. The survey raises a lot of questions, some of them answered at the online version, which is hyperlinked at the end of the article, although it does not answer why two (now-disbanded) PCTs refused to supply information the bureau wanted to put in the public domain. — Ed.

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