The Waste Market is dead, long live Kingsland: new market answers Hackney council’s critics

kingslandMkt©DA0718L: Ieva Paulina, of Dalston (from Latvia), market browser, on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com
Browser: Dalstoner Ieva Paulina enjoyed Hackney’s latest street market
kingslandMkt©DA0718: Katy Essex of Market Harborough in her stall on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com kingslandMkt©DA0718: Katy Essex of Market Harborough in her stall on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com
Millennial: traders and punters were younger than those at the Waste

WITH LITTLE FANFARE a new market opened in Hackney today Saturday 28 July 2018 and traders and the public took to it.

Kingsland Market controversially replaces the Waste, the Kingsland Road jumble of stalls where working-class people found affordable furniture, clothes, other household essentials and toys and leisure items. kingslandMkt©DA0718sign: in Kingsland Rd, Hagggerston E8, 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com

It was known as the Waste because it was on unused land between the Fox pub at Middleton Road in the south, and in the north, the present Oxfam location at Forest Road E8 4AR.

Loving Dalston campaigned with a series of articles to save the traditional and loved market from a Hackney council process of attrition, inspired by the complaints of local shopkeepers, but the market collapsed in 2014. The council announced it would organise a new market on the site and traders were suspicious it would be another Broadway Market.

Their fears were misplaced. Kingsland Market offerings today included fashion; small secondhand goods; books, old and new, and trainers, was smaller than its predecessor.

kingslandMkt©DA0718: Praktika camera (Eazst Germany, 1970s?) supposedly sold for £25 on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com
This Praktika film camera, good value when its maker, Soviet East Germany, kept the price low but now normally near-unsaleable, was said to have sold to a Chinese tourist for £25

It looked disconcertingly neat, lacking the disorder that used to suggest the possibility of bargains, but otherwise there were few differences between it and the Waste.

Andy Tomarsi, who brought his tools stall back to the pitch he had when the market was called the Waste, told Loving Dalston: “It [the market] looks alright. I’m doing good already.”

ikngslandMkt©DA0718Andy: Andy Tomarsi, who brought his tools stall back to the pitch he had when the market was called the Waste, on 1st day of Kingsland Market 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com ("Frank" in foreground wanted to be in the pic
Return to success: Andy Tomarsi, left, was pleased with the first day

Waste veteran Harry West’s stall seemed to fill the gap left by the departure from Londons market by market legend Norman used to produce from his van.

Susana Bastos, selling bric-a-brac, said: “The market has been open only a few hours and I’m happy so far.”

kingslandMkt©DA0718: HarryWest: Waste veteran Harry West on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com
Sale: Waste survivor Harry West does a deal in the new market

Her pitch cost her £100 for four Saturdays — which she agreed was good value — and a six-month trading licence £50. She had also bought a year’s insurance. 

Katy Essex, who moved from Hackney to open a small brocante shop in Market Harborough, Leicestershire, returned to try a £32 one-day stall. It was worth it: “there’s been a lot of footfall”.

kingslandMkt©DA0718: Katy Essex of Market Harborough in her stall on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com kingslandMkt©DA0718: Katy Essex of Market Harborough in her stall on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com
Down to Hackney: Katy Essex came from Market Harborough

A modest community note was struck by Lisa Lue Affat and Debbie Mitchener, who hired a stall for the Wilton Estate Tenants and Residents Association — with help from the Greggs Foundation,” they hastily added — to offer food items and floor displays produced by volunteers on the Dalston estate.

The market stalls attracted a younger clientele than the Waste did. One of them, Ieva Paulina, of Dalston, who is originally from Latvia, said she liked the look of the market and would come again. 

kingslandMkt©DA0718: Lisa Lue Affat, L, and Debbie Mitchener, in BWIltxon Estate TRA stall, on 1st day of Kingsland Market (ex The Waste) 280718 © David.Altheer@gmail.com
Communitarians: Lisa Lue Affat, left, and Debbie Mitchener, at the WIlton Estate stall

David Altheer 280718

* Pictures © DavidAltheer @ gmail.com, and for sale for reproduction. Bigger format versions are usually available.

* Backstory: Kingsland market to close; High rise in Ridley Road; Seven-floor application at 75 refused; Rambling Down Ridley Road’s favourite shops

* Emboldened underscored words in most cases indicate a hyperlink, a reader service rare among websites. If a link does not work, it is probably because the site to which the URL refers has not been maintained. A link indicates neither approval nor disapproval by Loving Dalston.

This site welcomes fair comments, including the critical. They may be edited for grammatical, legal or taste reasons, or for shortening. In the unlikely event that anything defamatory is posted, the sender’s details may have to be divulged. (Under UK law, this applies to any comment/discussion forum, eg, Twitter.) RSS feed link is at top right. Twitter: @lovingdalston Publicists, amateur and professional, should read http://bit.ly/ZnClKc Also relevant may be the note at the end of http://bit.ly/117GXmi Photographs © David Altheer unless otherwise stated and apart from supplied pictures

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